Tutorials

Oils: Hog Bristle

Video: Hog bristles are a natural animal fiber that work well for moving large amounts of oil color across a canvas. Water tends to bloat the hog bristle hairs and make them splay out.  Hog brushes used with acrylic, watercolor or other media that involves the use of water tend to lose their shape quickly.

Oils: Basic Flesh Tone

Video: Some of the most successful portrait painters suggest using a minimum of four colors to create a skin tone.  Some commonly used colors are burnt sienna, yellow ochre, unbleached titanium, cad yellow medium, cadmium red medium, and Payne’s gray.

Oils: Using Zinc White

Video: When the tinting strength of Titanium White is too overpowering for what you are painting, try a Titanium-Zinc white combination, or a small amount of Zinc white instead.

General Tips: Prepping Masonite

Video: Prep your masonite by washing it down with rubbing alcohol.

General Tips: Using Gesso

Video: Grumbacher Gesso is a thick, acrylic-based gesso that works well for priming raw canvas.

Oils: Using Acrylics in Oil Painting

Video: Never mix oil colors with acrylics or paint acrylics on top of oils.  However, oils may be applied over acrylics in a few circumstances.  Acrylic gesso is a great primer for raw canvas, and many oil painters prefer to use this type of gesso before oil painting.  Acrylic paint may also be used in […]

Watercolors: How to Lighten Color

Video: Partially lift color in areas by blotting up wet color can give a subtle, ghostly effect.

Watercolors: How to Paint White

Video: The best way to use white in a watercolor painting is simply to leave an area unpainted, allowing the paper to show through.

Watercolors: What to Mix First

Video: Paint with light colors first and work up to darker colors.

Watercolors: Fixing Mistakes

Video: Some mistakes can be lifted by sponging with clean water and blotting; however, some “staining” pigments can’t be entirely removed.